In the early 90's, following renovations to the CIBC building, and much to my dismay, the sculpture was moved indoors to the tower's atrium, becoming almost indiscernible behind its glass walls. It was a huge loss to the public in my view, and I am absolutely thrilled to be able to enjoy this wonderful work of art un-obscured again.

Henry Spencer Moore (1898 - 1986) was a true Kentish gentleman. One of England's greatest contemporary sculptors, he remained close to his surroundings, living a frugal life, most of his income going towards endowing the Henry Moore Foundation in support of the arts.
He was a terrific draughtsman, producing hundreds of drawings, and not just of reclining nudes - one of his favourite themes - but also of sheep that roamed the fields around his home, and other creatures great and small.

But it is undeniably his oblique, fragmented human forms - mostly cast in bronze and exhibited in public spaces around the globe - that made him famous and that set him apart from his contemporaries. Suggestive of the female body, subtly erotic, Moore's sculptures defy classification. They belong as much to nature as they do to art, and perhaps, ultimately, there is no telling the two apart.

Montreal Museum of Fine Arts
1380 Sherbrooke St W
Montreal, QC
www.mbam.qc.ca(lien externe)

Henry Moore Foundation

Photo credits:
Henry Moore, (1898-1986), Three Piece Reclining Figure No 1, 1961-1962, bronze, 1/7, cast Hermann Noack, Berlin. MMFA, gift of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.
© The Henry Moore Foundation. All Rights Reserved, DACS / SODRAC (2017).Photo Sébastien Roy.

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