PAUL ROSENBAUM
1949-2018
Reflections
Galerie de la ville
12001 boul. de Salaberry, DDO
www.centreartdollard.com(lien externe)

April 28 to May 27, 2018

www.artap.com(lien externe)

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There is always a note of sadness to any posthumous art exhibition, but it is becomes even more poignant when the artist dies days before the opening. Paul Rosenbaum was a wonderfully prolific and versatile creator. He attended Concordia University's Fine Arts programme, where he studied with many well-known artists like Marion Wagschal, Guido Molinari and Irene F. Whittome, to name a few. Inspired by nature and landscape, he drew endless inspiration from the city and its surroundings. Parc Jeanne-Mance, Fletcher's Field, the east slope of Mount Royal, all found their way into his paintings. Rosenbaum was also a prolific sculptor, and many of his figures are on display in the show, as are his drawings and sketches. Organized by one of his former teachers, artist Claudine Ascher, this retrospective marks the end of a creative output, which ensues after the loss of any artist, but it also speaks of the power of art to survive, bestowing a kind of immortality on the artist. There was another side to Rosenbaum's creative production; he was a skilled and respected graphic designer, "with a deep passion for the art of type, which he used with precision and mastery", in the words of his friend and art dealer David Astrof, who is also the invited co-curator of the retrospective. In an essay accompanying the exhibition, he describes the artist's fascinating workshop.

" His small studio was crammed with the evidence of a multi-talented individual who was engaged in a variety of inspirations and creative endeavours. Visitors would see graphics projects piled high on his drafting table, type catalogues and design magazines layered on the coffee table, sketch pads, carving tools, musical instruments, rocks, painting supplies, and the essential waxing machine that was always hot and ready to roll. Along with the ever-present print projects and overflowing ashtrays, there was often a hockey game on the TV in the background, a guitar being strummed, and more often than not, friends – and family."

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