By Dorota Kozinska

In 2017, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts inaugurated its first Art Hive, a space devoted to art therapy, and open to a wide public, where visitors of all ages could engage in creative activities and exchange of ideas.
A year later, and a different kind of hive is causing a buzz at the MMFA. The pun is unavoidable for we are speaking of two urban beehives that have just been installed on an outdoor terrace on the second storey of the Michal and Renata Hornstein Pavilion for Peace. Of a huge, and precious as bees keep disappearing around the planet, benefit to the ecosystem, the hives will house 100,000 bees that can pollinate an area of some 5 km. This urban beekeeping installation will help protect bees, as their decline continues to cause concern.
The hives were provided by Alvéole, an enterprise launched by three friends in 2012, who called it first and foremost a labour of love. Having spent many years as beekeepers in Manitoba, they took on the mission to pursue their passion for bees closer to people, i.e. in an urban environment. Their vision merges love of beekeeping with education and community outreach, and the museum project fall right into that category. "With the addition of two urban hives, the MMFA is helping to make Montreal one of the world's most dynamic cities in terms of urban agriculture," said Alex McLean, co-founder of Alvéole. "This movement which aims to transform cities into oases for pollinators, constitutes a springboard to raise awareness of the importance of bees, since a third of our food supplies depend on their pollination."
And if you wonder what can bees have in common with art... well, all you have to do is watch them dance on the air... Check it out!

www.mbam.qc.ca(lien externe)
alveole.buzz(lien externe)

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Photo credits:
Photo MMFA, Sébastien Roy