Combining the disciplines of art and architecture in the service of the city was perhaps his greatest achievement, forever immortalized in his seminal work, the sculpture garden across from the Canadian Centre for Architecture. People continue to mill around his high flung sculptural pieces, wonderfully at home with this surreal installation of floating chairs and classical temples. But Charney meant so much more to this city and the importance of public art, much of it now forgotten. His public works and art are iconic, beginning with the world’s first human rights monument in Ottawa, through his infamous Corridor’art demolished by Jean Drapeau on the eve of Montreal’s Summer Olympics, to the artwork he created for the Venice Biennale and the Canadian Museum of Photography. Born in 1935, Charney studied architecture at McGill and Yale, later working in Paris and New York before returning to Montreal. He always longed to be an artist, and even studied at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts under none other than Arthur Lismer, one of the Group of Seven painters. Ultimately, Melivn Charney created his own legacy, drawing inspiration from art in all its guises, combining it with the demanding and holistic craft of architecture, which embodies all the disciplines in a way that no other medium can. Charney and his vision is immortalized in stone, literally, and at the same time in the soul of this city, whose beauty and heritage he fought steadfastly to preserve.
www.cca.qc.ca/en(lien externe)

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© CCA

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© CCA

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© CCA

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Portrait of Melvin Charney by Michel Boulet © CCA