Laure Prouvost, a mixed media artist who has lived in London since studying at Goldsmith College and later Central St Martins more than a decade ago, won for her video installation Wantee.
Called a 'digital artist for the Instagram generation', she brought her two-month-old baby on stage to accept the award and the £25,000 (USD 43,874) cheque that came with it. Prouvost's immersive video work - the viewer sits amidst garishly bohemian furniture watching a film that combines actual footage with painterly interludes - beat the three other entries: David Shrigley with his outsized and disproportioned figure peeing into a bucket, performance artist Tino Sehgal, and painter Lynette Yadom-Boakye. They were each awarded £5,000 (USD 8,169).
The Turner Prize, established in 1984, is awarded annually to a British artist under fifty for an outstanding exhibition or other presentation of their work in the twelve months preceding16 April 2013. It showcases new developments in contemporary British art and is widely recognised as one of the most important and prestigious awards for the visual arts in Europe. The prize was founded by a group called the Patrons of New Art that was formed in 1982 to help buy new art for the Tate Gallery’s collection, and to encourage wider interest in contemporary art. The Patrons wanted a name associated with great British art; they chose J.M.W. Turner (1775–1851) partly because he had wanted to establish a prize for young artists. He also seemed appropriate because his work was controversial in his own day. Not as controversial, however, as many of the recipients, which include the duo Gilbert and George, and Damian Hirst but also sculptors Anish Kapoor and Antony Gormley, and filmmaker Steve McQueen.

 
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Laure Prouvost
Room view

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Laure Prouvost