The fusion of image and sound that is Ikeda’s poetic organizing of space has mathematics at its source, the queen of all sciences, and I often think, the highest form of art. How they come about is a colossal enigma, for the artist offers no explanation for his creative process, insisting on an unadulterated experience. It’s a solitary one, just as it is intended to be.

Ikeda was born in 1966 in Gifu, Japan, and now lives and works in Paris. He began his career performing and exhibiting internationally, with, among others, the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne; MIT, Boston; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Sónar Festival Barcelona; Tate Modern, London; Mutek Festival, and many other electronic music festivals as well as small DJ clubs.

Now, as part of the second edition of Montréal’s International Digital Arts Biennial (BIAN), the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (MAC) is showing the film version of C⁴I, an iconic work by this versatile, eclectic artist, composer and performer. The diminutive Ikeda who can converse with the greatest minds from Harvard and the Smithsonian, is characteristically silent on the subject of his vast and eclectic knowledge. His work is pure aesthetic, pure formalism, both visually and intellectually, and he leaves the interpretation to the viewer. One of the leading names in the field of minimalist electronic music, Ikeda, described by the Musée’s Director and Chief Curator John Zeppetelli as “the great poet of our current age of digital exploration,” pursues a practice that explores the rationality, simplicity and intricacy of ultrasounds, frequencies and the essential characteristics of sound.

C⁴I will be screened in Beverley Webster Rolph Hall at the MAC until June 18.

 
Montreal Museum of Contemporary Art (MAC)
185 St. Catherine Street W.
Montreal, QC
514.847.6226
www.macm.org(lien externe)

 
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C⁴I, AUDIOVISUAL CONCERT, 2004-06
Ryoji Ikeda
© Ryoji Ikeda
Photo: Kazuo Fukunaga.
Courtesy of YCAM (Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media)

 
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