The simplest, and most contemporary of shapes - an egg - was re-fashioned by Fabergé and his atelier. Used within the tradition of Orthodox Easter, the eggs were created for Czars Alexander lll and Nicholas ll. Of the 50 eggs made, only 43 are known to have survived, one of which – Imperial Watch Egg (1897) – was just discovered this year. Unbelievably, it was found in a market and bought for scrap gold. Now at London’s Wartski Gallery, it is one of 4 loaned for the exhibition.

All the Fabergé pieces have intricately fine workmanship; tiny hinges open to reveal miniature works of art. One such piece is the Imperial Peter the Great Easter Egg (1903), which opens to reveal a miniature replica of the famous equestrian statue of Peter the Great. Along with the imperial eggs, there is an array of art objects produced in the Fabergé Saint Petersburg workshops. One of these is a picture frame with the photo of one of the czar’s daughter, the Grand Duchess Tatiana. It was discovered in the house where the czar and his family were executed in 1918.

The exhibition comprises some 240 objects, including four of the forty-three remaining famous Easter eggs commissioned by the Romanovs.

Fabulous Fabergé: Jeweller to the Czars

Montreal Museum of Fine Arts
Michal and Renata Hornstein Pavilion
1380 Sherbrooke Street West

www.mbam.qc.ca(lien externe)

June 14 – October 5, 2014

 
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Imperial Cesarvic Easter Egg, 1912

 
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Imperial Pelican Easter Egg, 1897

 
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Imperial Pelican Easter Egg, 1897

 
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Imperial Peter the Great Easter Egg, 1903