Born in 1974, Myre is an Algonquin member of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation, according to her artist biography. She is a graduate of Camosun College (1995), Emily Carr (1997), and Concordia University (MFA, 2002). She has had numerous solo exhibitions in her prolific career, most recently: Needleworks (McLaren Art Centre, Barrie, Ontario), Nadia Myre: Symbology (Carleton University Art Gallery, Ottawa) and Skin Tissue – as part of Hides: Skin as Material and Metaphor (National Museum of the American Indian, New York, NY). She is busy with a variety of upcoming exhibitions this year and next, including in Senegal and, yes, Montreal (Orison, at Oboro gallery).

Myre is known for her multi-disciplinary practice inspired by recurring themes of identity, language, longing and loss, that weaves art and autobiography into poignant works of art. In an interview with CBC News in Montreal earlier this year, Myre said, “I would describe myself as a visual activist. A lot of the work that I’m making has a political base, and as a conceptual artist, I’m trying to say something.” Myre’s oeuvre is as contemporary as it is solidly rooted in her culture, and the way she combines new media with traditional practice, such as beadwork, produces works that are unique and deeply personal. She employs women to help her with the detailed and labour-intensive craftwork that she incorporates into her compositions, thus carrying on the tradition of women working together in the name, and wellbeing, of the community.

 
www.nadiamyre.com(lien externe)
www.artgalleryofnovascotia.ca(lien externe)
www.sobeyartaward.ca(lien externe)

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Nadia Myre

 
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Scar project

 
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Scarscapes (detail)

 
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Meditations on Red

 
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Indian Act (detail), 2002